Council Plan 2021/22

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This Council Plan sets out our ambitions and what we plan to achieve by 2024 for our four overarching priority outcomes: driving sustainable economic growth; keeping vulnerable people safe; helping people help themselves; and making best use of resources in the short and long term.

The Council provides services used by all residents in East Sussex, including providing care and support to children, families and the elderly; maintaining the roads and providing library services; and working to boost the local economy. We have a long term track record for delivery, producing excellent results for the public.

2020/21 posed a number of unprecedented challenges for the Council, with COVID-19 having a tragic effect on many people in East Sussex, while also seeing a significant increase in the demand for, and cost of, social care and health services. The Council’s resources have been reducing in real terms since 2010, and this financial challenge has only been exacerbated by the increased costs associated with responding to the pandemic.

The Government has made additional funding available, which has been very welcome, however a long term funding solution has not been agreed presenting an ongoing challenge. As grants from Government have reduced, we have become more dependent on local council tax and business rates. However these bear little relationship to the need for services on the ground, and the level of business rates received may be affected by the economic challenges facing the county as we recover from the pandemic.

As our resources do not reflect the demand for services we will continue to adjust our services to match the funds we have. We have been democratic, open and honest in determining the best level and quality of services we can provide, within available resources, and reviewed our Core Offer in 2020/21 to take account of the impact of the pandemic and the new operating context.

We consider the Core Offer to be the realistic level of service we must provide, to both fulfil our statutory duties, and meet local need. In doing this we have based our decisions on local evidence of need and what works and makes a difference locally.

We do not work in isolation, so we will continue to work with all our partners to make sure there is a shared view of priorities and that we make the most of opportunities and resources available locally. We lobby hard to protect and promote the interests of East Sussex.

We have set a number of delivery outcomes under each overarching priority outcome. These shape the Council Plan performance measures and targets that are the main tool we use to assess our progress. We also keep track of a wide range of related key data evidencing local need in East Sussex.

These help us assess our impact more fully and respond appropriately when we need to do so. We review this data when making our plans and publish them with our State of the County report each year. A selection of this information is provided throughout the plan and listed in more detail at the end.

The Council has played a key role, through Team East Sussex in the publication of the East Sussex Economy Recovery Plan. The plan sets out six missions, with each mission outlining a different way in which the economy in the county can go beyond recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic and can grow and thrive while also becoming cleaner and greener.

As a member of the Environment Board for East Sussex, the Council also played a key role in the development of the East Sussex Environment Strategy 2020. The Council declared a climate emergency in October 2019, and is working on plans to move towards carbon neutrality in all its operations as soon as possible, and in any event by 2050.

Council Leader, Keith Glazier
Keith Glazier - Leader
Chief Executive, Becky Shaw
Becky Shaw - Chief Executive

Our priorities

The Council has four overarching priority outcomes: driving sustainable economic growth; keeping vulnerable people safe; helping people help themselves; and making best use of resources in the short and long term. Making best use of resources in the short and long term is the gateway priority through which any activity and accompanying resources must pass. For each priority outcome there are specific delivery outcomes.

Driving sustainable economic growth

  • East Sussex businesses are supported to recover and grow through the delivery of the Economy Recovery Plan
  • The county’s employment and productivity rates are maximised
  • Individuals, communities and businesses thrive in East Sussex with the environmental and social infrastructure to meet their needs
  • The workforce has and maintains the skills needed for good quality employment to meet the needs of the future East Sussex economy
  • The value of our role as both a significant employer and a buyer of local goods and services is maximised
  • All children progress well from early years to school leaver and into education, training and employment

Keeping vulnerable people safe

  • All vulnerable people in East Sussex are known to relevant local agencies and services are delivered together to meet their needs
  • People feel safe at home
  • People feel safe with services
  • We work with the wider health and care system to support people affected by Covid-19 to achieve the best health outcomes possible

Helping people help themselves

  • Commissioners and providers from all sectors put people first when providing services and information to help them meet their needs
  • The most vulnerable get the support they need to maintain their independence and this is provided at or as close to home as possible
  • Through our work with others, individuals and communities are encouraged to maintain and develop local mutual support systems

Making best use of resources in the short and long term

  • Working as One Council, both through the processes we use and how we work across services
  • Delivery through strong and sustained partnership working across the public, voluntary community, and private sectors to ensure that all available resources are used to deliver maximum benefits to local people
  • Ensuring we achieve value for money in the services we commission and provide
  • Maximising the funding available through bidding for funding and lobbying for the best deal for East Sussex
  • To help tackle Climate Change East Sussex County Council activities are carbon neutral as soon as possible and in any event by 2050

Priority - Driving sustainable economic growth

Priority overview

A thriving economy in East Sussex is key to the wellbeing of the county. Ensuring that local people have access to relevant training and employment, well designed local infrastructure and services, a positively managed environment and accessible cultural activities, will have a positive impact on their wellbeing, enabling them to live independently of public sector support or benefits. Supporting our economy to recover and grow sustainably will help our communities to be more resilient and our businesses to be more competitive.

1.1 Economic recovery

Delivery outcome: East Sussex businesses are supported to recover and grow through the delivery of the Economy Recovery Plan

East Sussex Reset: The Economy Recovery Plan for East Sussex, aims to build sustainable prosperity for our businesses, voluntary, community and social enterprise sectors, and support residents to access new opportunities that drive economic recovery and resilience.

Developed by Team East Sussex (TES), the local economic growth board, in direct response to COVID-19, the Recovery Plan focuses on businesses, skills and employment in a post COVID-19 landscape. The plan also supports other activities being progressed at a local level, including climate change and health and wellbeing initiatives.

The Plan consists of six missions: Thinking Local, Acting Local; Building Skills, Creating Jobs; Fast Forwarding Business; Better Places, Fuller Lives; Cleaner Energy, Greener Transport; and The Future is Digital. The plan seeks to deliver the change that is required to both respond to the pandemic but also capitalise on the opportunities it presents.

Trading Standards will continue to offer assistance to businesses in East Sussex to ensure they adapt and thrive in the changing regulatory regimes brought about by the UK’s departure from the EU in December 2020.

1.2 Employment and productivity

Delivery outcome: The county’s employment and productivity rates are maximised

The county is an economy of small businesses with great potential for growth. We deliver the Business East Sussex Growth Hub and a range of bespoke business support programmes to help businesses thrive and diversify, as well as grants and loans programmes to support sustainable growth.

We have increased capacity to support business through the UK’s transition from the EU and work closely with our partners to provide specialist advice, particularly in relation to exporting. Our commissioned Inward Investment service, Locate East Sussex, will continue to support existing businesses to grow and expand and also attract new businesses to move into East Sussex, offering increased employment opportunities for the local workforce.

1.3 Local infrastructure

Delivery outcome: Individuals, communities and businesses thrive in East Sussex with the environmental and social infrastructure to meet their needs

Businesses can only thrive if they have the local infrastructure they need and access to the right skills in the local workforce. Our Highways contract with Costain and Jacobs is helping to maintain and improve our roads, while ensuring value for money for the Council.

We also coordinate street works and manage parking controls, to help the local transport infrastructure cope with increasing demand. A number of infrastructure projects will continue or be delivered in 2021/22, including new improvements to Terminus Road in Eastbourne as well as walking and cycling improvements in Eastbourne, Bexhill and Hastings.

Business in the 21st century also need modern digital infrastructure. Our e-Sussex project to rollout super and ultra-fast broadband across the county has improved access to services, jobs and education, and has played a key role in enabling people to work from home during the pandemic.

Over 75,000 premises have been connected to improved broadband speeds during our first and second contracts of work with BT. We will continue to deliver a third phase of works in 2021/22, with the aim of connecting as close to 100% of premises in the county as possible. We will work with Government to support its plans to deliver even better digital and mobile infrastructure.

Together with over 70 partner organisations we have established a shadow Sub-National Transport Body called Transport for the South East (TfSE). TfSE has published a Transport Strategy for the South East, which sets out a plan through which the South East’s economy could double over the next 30 years. The Strategy will be enhanced by a number of studies, which will inform a Strategic Investment Plan, which will set out a programme for investment over the next three decades.

We will build on the county’s economic strengths and unique characteristics to drive economic growth in sectors with the most potential to grow and provide employment. We will build on the areas where the county performs strongly, such as the creative industries and the visitor economy, construction, engineering, health and social care, and food and drink production; and look to the future to attract and retain new businesses that will provide the jobs of tomorrow.

Transport For The South East Logo
Transport for the South East logo

1.4 Workforce skills

Delivery outcome: The workforce has and maintains the skills needed for good quality employment to meet the needs of the future East Sussex economy

We want all local people to have the skills they need to succeed and for businesses to have access to a skilled workforce. Skills East Sussex (SES), the county’s employment and skills board will continue to bring education providers together with business, to make sure that local training offers are relevant to the local economy.

SES provider-employer partnerships deliver a range of programmes to improve careers advice for young people to: deliver retraining programmes for adults and young people via the Government's Plan for Jobs; promote and deliver work-based training via schemes such as Apprenticeships and T-Levels; and to support those adults and young people who are furthest from the work place through careers, pre-employment and digital inclusion initiatives.

1.5 Our role

Delivery outcome: The value of our role as both a significant employer and a buyer of local goods and services is maximised

As a body with significant spending power in the county we constantly review our procurement processes to ensure they are accessible to local suppliers, maximise the use of local providers in the supply chains, and secure added economic, social and environmental benefits. We have also updated our Social Value Measurement Charter to incorporate new measures that directly address the recovery of the local economy.

The Council has been paying the Apprenticeship Levy of approximately £1m per year since 2017. We have successfully implemented a workforce-based approach and have developed a strategy and action plan to maximise our draw down of the Levy to support employing new apprentices and current staff receiving qualifying apprenticeship training.

The Local Government Association has recognised the work the Council’s Apprenticeship team have done within our maintained schools and have used the Council as a case study to promote good practice for other authorities. Additionally, we are seeking to leverage the new Apprentice Incentive Scheme and Kickstart Programme that has been announced by central government to address sharp rises in unemployment, particularly for those aged 18-24, following the COVID-19 pandemic.

Low Carbon Across the South East (LoCASE) is a grant funded programme at the Council to support small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to reduce their costs and their carbon footprint. The successful supplier has committed to provide Social Value of £13k, which represents over 17% of the initial contract value of £75k. This included wellbeing and environmental training, working with local suppliers and community groups on carbon saving initiatives and volunteering time dedicated to the sustainability of local green areas. They also committed to the delivery of this contract being carbon neutral, which will be the first services contract to achieve this for the Council.

1.6 Children

Delivery outcome: All children progress well from early years to school leaver and into education, training and employment

We want local people to have the skills they need to succeed and all children to progress well from early years through school and into education, training and employment. We will work in partnership with schools and settings, within available resources, to meet the needs of all pupils and deliver excellent educational outcomes.

We will continue to place a strong focus on our most disadvantaged pupils to ensure that they achieve consistently high outcomes. We will also work closely with every school, setting and college to secure a strong Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) offer which makes education accessible to all children in their local community school.

The Hastings Opportunity Area is now in its fourth year and continues to work with local businesses, schools, colleges and nurseries to improve the education, emotional and mental wellbeing and employment prospects of young people in the town. Examples of best practice from this programme have been embedded across all areas of our work.

Educational attainment is negatively affected by poor rates of attendance. We will work closely with partners to secure a shared commitment across all providers to address pockets of poor attendance and reduce exclusions for all groups of children and young people. We will also develop and share best practice for encouraging attendance in the post 16 phase.

We will work with our partners, to promote post 16 participation in education and training, including provision and support for vulnerable groups and young people with learning difficulties/disabilities. Together, we will ensure that we prepare young people for work and improve their employability skills, including developing and utilising new online resources and virtual engagement activities and events, in response to restrictions imposed due to the pandemic.

The Excellence for All strategy 2019 - 2021, published in September 2019, outlines the shared vision, values and ambitions the Council and our partners have for creating an excellent education system in East Sussex where no pupil or educational establishment is left behind. Excellence for All will be updated again in 2021. It will address our learning from COVID-19 and the ways in which we can harness the creative solutions we developed to tackle the challenges of lockdown, to long-term, positive effect.

Bus stop advertisement promoting the ‘We Are Ready’ campaign, which encouraged pupils to return to school in September 2020
Advertisement promoting the ‘We Are Ready’ campaign, encouraging pupils to return to school in September 2020. Credit: Tom & Friends www.tomandfriends.co.uk

1.7 Planned work

Examples of planned work during 2021/22

  • Alongside partners we will begin to implement the East Sussex Economic Recovery Plan to help businesses and communities recover from the impact of COVID-19 on the economy
  • The Business East Sussex (BES) Growth Hub is working with partners, including the Sussex Chamber of Commerce, to help East Sussex businesses with advice following the end of the EU transition period, with Business Navigators on hand to offer the latest information on what businesses need to do
  • We will continue our third phase of works with BT to ensure as close to 100% of premises in the county as possible have access to superfast broadband
  • We will aim to ensure at least 60% of the Council’s circa £400m procurement spend is with local companies
  • Our Social Value Measurement Charter (SVMC) continues to ensure that social value commitments such as apprenticeships, work experience, support for local community projects and environmental initiatives are secured through Council procured contracts
  • Three Mental Health Support Teams in East Sussex will go live in 2021, providing a year-round service, with interventions for children in school and also available in the school holidays, delivering low intensity support and developing whole school approaches
  • A new East Sussex Teaching Schools Network website will be launched which will enable users to access school to school support, and will provide a directory of courses and training opportunities offered locally and through partners across and beyond East Sussex

1.8 Targets

Performance measures and targets

Take a look at the targets we have set to measure our progress against delivering the outcomes under this priority:

1.9 State of the County 2019/20

We review a wide range of data about East Sussex to help us understand the context for our plans and the impact we are having through our work and in partnership. We publish this data each year in our State of the County report when we start the planning process that leads to this Council Plan.


Priority - Keeping vulnerable people safe

Priority overview

Ensuring vulnerable children and adults are safe is one of our key priorities and responsibilities to the community.

There will always be children and adults who cannot be looked after at home by their families. Where it is clear this is the case for children, we will intervene early and find permanent or long-term placements for them through fostering or adoption where appropriate. We will be ambitious so that they can achieve their best and we will continue with effective placement planning to ensure that the right child is cared for, in the right place, for the right amount of time and at the most appropriate cost. We will also ensure that vulnerable adults are safeguarded whether they are looked after at home or somewhere else.

The pandemic has resulted in some very specific new tasks and functions for Public Health and the challenges of adapting services and responding to new and emerging needs will continue to shape much of our work; whilst also changing the role of Public Health or the challenges already identified pre COVID-19. As demand for both health and social care services continues to increase and the financial challenges facing the Council remain, we will continue to ensure a focus on prevention and early intervention.

Campaign artwork. The East Sussex Youth Cabinet launched a ‘Stay’ campaign during Covid-19 to support young people.  The artwork reads: Stay Well, Stay Informed, Stay Home, Stay Sunny.
The East Sussex Youth Cabinet launched a ‘Stay’ campaign during COVID-19 to support young people

2.1 Vulnerable people

Delivery outcome: All vulnerable people in East Sussex are known to relevant local agencies and services are delivered together to meet their needs

One of our key objectives is that there is an effective multi-agency early help and child protection system, which ensures that children and young people who are, or are likely to be, at risk of harm are identified, supported and protected. This is part of a wider multi-agency safeguarding system, underpinned by strong statutory multi-agency governance and scrutiny by the East Sussex Safeguarding Children Partnership.

Through the partnership network of organisations which constitute the Children and Young People’s Trust, we aim to work across health, social care, education, and criminal justice. We will work with partners in the statutory and voluntary sector to progress our priorities.

Ongoing government funding has now been confirmed for the Troubled Families programme in 2021/22. We will use this to support keywork and we will also work with partners to promote a whole system, whole family approach and identify as many external funding streams as possible to sustain family support programmes and youth work.

The East Sussex Safeguarding Adults Board (SAB) oversees the work undertaken towards the prevention of abuse, the SAB’s areas of focus include:

  • Ensuring the SAB provides strategic leadership to embed the principles of safeguarding across agencies and contributes to the prevention of abuse and neglect.
  • Establishing robust feedback mechanisms on safeguarding policies and procedures.
  • Making safeguarding personal, making sure adults are involved and consulted in the process of helping them to stay safe and agreeing goals.
  • Ensuring learning from reviews is effectively embedded into practice to facilitate organisational change across agencies.
  • Ensuring the workforce is equipped to support adults appropriately where abuse and neglect are suspected.

The Council’s partnership work with the NHS takes place in the wider context of the Sussex Health and Care Partnership, which formally became the Sussex Integrated Care System (ICS) in April 2020.  East Sussex is one of three place-based partnerships within the Sussex ICS, (alongside Brighton and Hove and West Sussex), with the Council being a lead partner with our local NHS in the East Sussex Integrated Care Partnership.

Together we have agreed our East Sussex Health and Social Care Plan which sets out our shared Council priorities and commitments in the NHS Long Term Plan, and our ambitions to deliver greater levels of integrated care, early intervention and prevention to improve health and wellbeing outcomes and reduce health inequalities in our population.

Health and Social Care Connect, the Adult Social Care and Health (ASCH) contact centre, has continued to operate throughout the pandemic and will continue to provide a single point for information, advice and access to community health and social care services seven days a week, from 8am to 8pm, with the addition of the Shielded Line support for periods of national or local lockdowns.

The ASCH Programme will develop the systems already in use to enable these to be used as effectively from a home base as from the office, for those staff who are self-isolating or for periods when it is not possible to physically accommodate the full team in the office, to ensure there is no impact on the service provided.

East Sussex Safeguarding Adults Board logo
East Sussex Safeguarding Adults Board logo
East Sussex Safeguarding Children logo
East Sussex Safeguarding Children Partnership logo

2.2 Safe at home

Delivery outcome: People feel safe at home

We work with partners, including health services, police, ambulance, and fire and rescue services, to ensure people are safeguarded and able to live independently and free from abuse. We will raise awareness of safeguarding issues and enquire into concerns of abuse.

We support the most vulnerable families, helping them to find ways to manage independently and cope with problems so that they can stay together where possible and achieve better outcomes for children and parents.

Early Help services support families to tackle their problems before they become more difficult to reverse. Following a review of services, we have implemented a strategy to support vulnerable families in East Sussex and help manage the demand for statutory social care. The strategy includes keywork with vulnerable families, early years family support services integrated with delivery of the Healthy Child Programme by our health visitors, and evidence-based youth work with vulnerable young people.

We also offer universal, open-access and drop-in early help services for children, families and young people where these are fully externally funded. We have a network of 16 children’s and youth centres.

We work in partnership to reduce crime, anti-social behaviour and domestic abuse and help victims to stay safe from harm. We work with a number of partners to provide support services and raise awareness of domestic abuse across the county.

Our Trading Standards service helps to protect vulnerable people from exploitation such as rogue traders and cold callers. We also investigate food fraud, illicit tobacco and counterfeit alcohol to protect people from the increased risks associated with these. These services are provided in partnership with the police to ensure an effective level of prevention and support work is offered to the residents and businesses of East Sussex.

2.3 Support services

Delivery outcome: People feel safe with support services

While we aim to help people stay safe and independent, this is not always possible. There will always be children and young people who cannot be cared for at home and with their families. Where it is clear this is the case for children, we will intervene early and find permanent or long-term, cost effective, placements for them through fostering or adoption where appropriate. Vulnerable adults that cannot cope by themselves need to have support services that are safe and of good quality; we will continue to monitor satisfaction with our commissioned services including through service user evaluations.

2.4 Health

Delivery outcome: We work with the wider health and care system to support people affected by Covid-19 to achieve the best health outcomes possible

ASCH have responded to the pandemic by adapting the way we provide support to vulnerable adults. It has been recognised that a longer term review of the ASCH model is needed to ensure that support continues to be provided while the pandemic is ongoing.

The ASCH Programme has therefore been initiated to recommend new ways of working, that ensure we continue to meet our statutory responsibilities under the Care Act and any new responsibilities specific to the pandemic. The Programme has a number of workstreams, which cover the contact and assessment pathway and associated support functions.

The Programme will need to take into account the potential long term impacts of COVID-19 on our population as we are already seeing people with an increasing level of need due to interruptions in their care and support. There are also the impacts of “long COVID” to consider, which seems to be affecting a proportion of those who have suffered with the virus for a number of months afterwards.

Stacked boxes of personal protective equipment ready for distribution from a Community hub
The Community Hub distributed thousands of items of PPE to help keep people safe during lockdown

2.5 Planned work

Examples of planned work during 2020/21

  • We will continue to help prevent vulnerable people from becoming a victim of mass marketing fraud and intervene if people have already become a victim
  • We will support people who have been a victim of sexual violence and domestic abuse through the specialist domestic abuse and sexual violence service

2.6 Targets

Performance measures and targets

Take a look at the targets we have set to measure our progress against delivering the aims under this priority:

2.7 State of the County 2019/20

We review a wide range of data about East Sussex to help us understand the context for our plans and the impact we are having through our work and in partnership. We publish this data each year in our State of the County report when we start the planning process that leads to this Council Plan.


Priority - Helping people help themselves

Priority overview

Whilst we must keep vulnerable people safe, people prefer and need to be independent. If we can encourage families and communities to work together to build better local communities, meet local need, and support individuals to stay independent, we can meet our objectives of breaking dependency, while reducing demand for services and therefore costs. Helping people to be self-supporting will become increasingly important as the resources available to public services decline.

3.1 Putting people first

Delivery outcome: Commissioners and providers from all sectors put people first when providing services and information to help them meet their needs

One of the best things we can do to support people is to focus very clearly on their needs when designing and providing services and when we make information available so people can help themselves.

Our focus is to provide people with the support they need as early as possible to help them remain healthy and independent. When they need them, our services will be provided by integrated health and care teams, meaning their care will be more efficient and personal, delivered by one system.

Our focus on providing support as early as possible should mean that people don’t need health and care services as much. But when they do, we will make sure they can get services quickly, easily and, before they reach crisis point.

We want to ensure that local people receive the right services, in the right place, at the right time. This may mean they access and use services differently. We aim to empower them with the knowledge of how to best use available health and social care services, and how to best get the support they need.

The integrated community health and social care services have implemented Discharge To Assess (D2A)/Home First pathways. The pathways are designed to avoid prolonged stays in hospital for people awaiting assessment or commissioned services to enable their discharge. Where possible D2A will aim to avoid unnecessary admissions to hospital, and where an admission is necessary, it will ensure that people are discharged as soon as is safe and practical, back to their own homes or to a D2A bed to have their assessments and services arranged outside of an acute hospital.

As part of the Core Offer for Adult Social Care we will provide information and advice for all those seeking care and support; and provide support that reduces the need for social care in the longer term and/or prevents the need for a more expensive service.

Public Health will continue to promote, protect and improve health and wellbeing, and reduce health inequalities. The needs and demands identified before COVID-19 will be married up with the needs and demands brought about by COVID-19 to ensure a coherent and effective future work plan.

We provide online access to information, for children and young people with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and their families, about services and expertise available in the area from a range of local organisations, including providers of education, health and social care. It also gives families the opportunity to feed back about services that are available. We will continue to promote these schemes to ensure that people are able to quickly find information about a range of support options available in their local area.

People generally prefer to have as much control and choice as possible over the services they receive. Self-directed support offers control to clients and carers over how their care and support is provided. Inclusion, Special Educational Needs and Disability (ISEND) has an important role to play in supporting pupils who are vulnerable to underachievement to do their very best.

The service helps improve the lives and outcomes of pupils with SEND, helping them to achieve their ambitions and become successful adults. We will carry out statutory assessments of children with SEN where there are significant barriers to learning and we will aim to secure the right education provision for those with the greatest need.

East Sussex Youth Cabinet supporting the Clap For Carers campaign in an online meeting
The East Sussex Youth Cabinet supported the clap for carers campaign, this image taken from their online meeting

3.2 Maintaining independence

Delivery outcome: The most vulnerable get the support they need to maintain their independence and this is provided at or as close to home as possible

It is often best if people in need of care and support receive this at home, if possible, with the help of friends and family. We work to ensure that people’s homes are safe, providing access to care services, and personal budgets so that people can choose the care and support they need.

Frail adults across East Sussex can receive Technology Enabled Care Services (TECS), to help manage risks and maintain independence at home. TECS includes Telecare, which offers a range of sensors and detectors to meet different needs, such as wearable alert buttons, fall detectors and medication dispensers. The sensors can be monitored 24/7 by a local contact centre.

Environmental sensors, such as smoke alarms or flood detectors are also linked to the centre for automatic alerts. Individuals can also benefit from scheduled live or recorded telephone calls to provide welfare checks or reminders during periods of reablement.

The Joint Targeted Area Inspection in February 2020 had a focus on the emotional wellbeing/mental health of children and young people and the inspection team commended many of the initiatives and services that are in place in the county. A multi-agency action plan has been developed to further improve services and that planning will also be linked to the findings of a Sussex wide Children & Young Person’s Emotional Health and Wellbeing Service Review which was published May 2020.

We are developing a coordinated strategy of support for schools and colleges to meet the mental health and emotional well-being needs of pupils, ensuring that advice is consistent and evidence-based. During the pandemic, we developed new offers to children, families and schools to support emotional wellbeing and we will use the understanding from these to inform future developments.

The county was also successful in its bid for three Mental Health Support Teams as part of the Government’s trailblazer scheme, which will become fully operational in spring 2021 working across 60 schools and providing mental health support for 24,000 pupils.

3.3 Local mutual support systems

Delivery outcome: Through our work with others, individuals and communities are encouraged to maintain and develop local mutual support systems

People, families and communities across East Sussex have huge potential to thrive and to support each other. There is a substantial infrastructure of public, voluntary and community sector work across the county that can seek to help local people achieve their ambitions.

We work with partners and communities across the county to help local communities thrive and tackle some of the most difficult issues that impact on people’s happiness and wellbeing, such as loneliness.

We are working with partners across health, social care, the voluntary and community sector, and others to increase community and personal resilience in East Sussex. We aim to increase volunteering; improve and coordinate support to strengthen communities; and help individuals to improve their own health and well-being and take action to prevent disease and ill health.

As driver error contributes to over 90% of road collisions where people are killed or seriously injured (KSI), we continue to implement our £1m project to deliver behaviour change initiatives, alongside our ongoing programme of work to improve the road infrastructure. The programme has identified a number of target groups who are at the greatest risk of having a road traffic collision resulting in a KSI casualty and trials of behaviour change initiatives focusing on these groups are underway.

3.4 Planned work

Examples of planned work 2021/22

  • We will increase the number of members of the Support with Confidence scheme, which provides a register of people and organisations that have been vetted and approved by us, so users can be confident in their safety, training and quality
  • We will support households as part of the government’s Troubled Families programme
  • The Flagship School, a special school for children with for children with autism and social, emotional and mental health difficulties is due to open in September 2021
  • We will continue to develop the specialist facilities programme to offer additional provision for pupils with autism and bring more capacity to local schools
East Sussex County Council Support with Confidence logo
East Sussex County Council Support with Confidence logo

3.5 Targets

Performance measures and targets

Take a look at the targets we have set to measure our progress against delivering the aims under this priority:

3.6 State of the County 2019/20

We review a wide range of data about East Sussex to help us understand the context for our plans and the impact we are having through our work and in partnership. We publish this data each year in our State of the County report when we start the planning process that leads to this Council Plan.


Priority - Making best use of resources in the short and long term

Priority overview

This priority underpins all our activities and is a key measure of success for all our priority outcomes. It applies to all the resources available for East Sussex, not only within the Council, but across the public sector, voluntary and community sector and private partners, and within local communities. We will work as a single unified organisation to deliver our priorities; ensuring high quality, streamlined services are commissioned and developed in partnership; working to reduce demand for services and focusing on our residents and communities. We will ensure that the decisions we take are sustainable in both the short and long term, ensuring they provide best value for money and support our ambitions to become carbon neutral.

4.1 One Council

Delivery outcome: Working as One Council, both through the processes we use and how we work across services

We will ensure that we work in a unified way so that resources are focused on delivering our priority outcomes. This means minimising the cost of back office services and directing resources to frontline services. We will focus on delivering services close to local people in the most cost effective way possible.

Our People Strategy recognises that the Council workforce is the key to our success. The strategy is based on the four themes of Leadership and Management; Performance Development and Reward; Employee Engagement and Inclusion; and Employee Health and Wellbeing.

In conjunction with this, a Leadership and Management Capability Framework has been developed which sets out the management and leadership expectations in support of the Council’s priority outcomes and operating principles. We are committed to the development of our workforce and embedding our People Strategy into our culture.

4.2 Working in partnership

Delivery outcome: Delivery through strong and sustained partnership working across the public, voluntary community, and private sectors to ensure that all available resources are used to deliver maximum benefits to local people

We will work in partnership across the public, voluntary and community, and private sectors to ensure that all appropriate available resources are used to deliver maximum benefits to local people. We will be proactive in making the best use of our assets, sharing property, ICT and staff with partners so we work as efficiently as possible, removing duplication and increasing flexibility. We will join with partners to seek opportunities to achieve better value through our procurement.

Orbis, our partnership with Surrey County Council and Brighton & Hove City Council for some of our back office services, has allowed us to provide resilient services while achieving savings which are being used to sustain services for residents of all three areas.

The Strategic Property Asset Collaboration in East Sussex was formed by a number of public and third sector organisations coming together in partnership, to look for opportunities to co-locate and collaborate around property, to ensure cost effectiveness and to improve the customer journey by creating more effective environments to deliver services from.

The Council is in an improvement partnership with West Sussex County Council (WSCC), to address the significant challenges that WSCC has faced and also offer opportunities for both authorities to work together on shared priorities, such as the coronavirus response and recovery, infrastructure, social care and climate change.

Orbis logo
Orbis logo

4.3 Value for money

Delivery outcome: Ensuring we achieve value for money in the services we commission and provide

Across all our resources, services and partnerships we will seek to achieve the maximum positive impact to deliver our priority outcomes for people in East Sussex.

We may need to consider further changes to our Waste and Library services to ensure we are providing the best service possible within the resources available.

We have been working to reduce the cost of occupancy of corporate buildings, by consolidating our buildings and reducing our spend on energy, by 2% each year since 2016/17. In 2021/22 we will review our use of corporate buildings and develop new ways of working based on revised business requirements as a result of the pandemic.

4.4 Maximising funding

Delivery outcome: Maximising the funding available through bidding for funding and lobbying for the best deal for East Sussex

We will continue to take all available opportunities to raise the distinct funding needs of the Council with Government until we have commitment of funding to cover all of the additional costs of COVID-19, as well as long term fair funding for our services; and we will work with partners to press for the best outcomes for the county.

In view of the ongoing financial challenge we face, the Council has reviewed its Core Offer in 2020/21, to ensure it continues to set out the ambitious but realistic level of service we think we must provide to both fulfil our statutory duties and meet local need in the current financial climate.

Feedback from our residents, partners and businesses helped develop the Core Offer and we are working with communities to build resilience where the Council can no longer provide services. Due to our funding position, even this Core Offer is unaffordable in the near future so we will use this model to work with our local MPs to press for the Government funding we need to provide the decent services we know are needed by this county.

4.5 Carbon neutral

Delivery outcome: To help tackle climate change East Sussex County Council activities are carbon neutral as soon as possible and in any event by 2050

We will build on our earlier work to ensure all Council activities are carbon neutral as soon as possible and in any event by 2050. A Climate Emergency Plan has been developed and we will be working within the plan to focus on reducing the carbon footprint of the Council’s operations. The target for 2021/22 is to have a further reduction of carbon emissions by 13% against the previous year.

Thermal image of County Hall before old windows were replaced with new energy-efficient windows (red areas in the image show heat loss)
Thermal image of County Hall before the old windows were replaced (red areas showing heat loss)
Thermal image of County Hall after new energy-efficient windows were installed - heat loss minimised
Thermal image of County Hall after new energy-efficient windows were installed - heat loss minimised

4.6 Planned work

Examples of planned work 2021/22

  • We will continue to embed the Orbis partnership; making cost savings while providing more effective and efficient services
  • We will reduce the amount of CO2 produced from Council operations
  • We will maintain or reduce the number of working days lost to sickness absence
  • We will begin to deliver, alongside partners, the Climate Action Plan that will help facilitate the take-up of electric vehicles; improve the energy efficiency of street lighting; and implement further energy efficiency measures for the Council’s buildings
  • We will refresh the Staff Travel Plan, particularly in light of COVID-19, to incorporate the commitments to the Climate Action Plan and reflect the evolving ways of working

4.7 Targets

Performance measures and targets

Take a look at the targets we have set to measure our progress against delivering the aims under this priority:


Revenue budget: gross and net

The charts below show how we will spend your revenue budget money in 2021/22, and where the money will come from (gross and net). More information on our revenue budget can be found in our financial budget summary which explains the difference between the gross and net budgets.

Doughnut chart of how we will spend your money (gross). Total £868.4 million. With £289.6 million for Adult Social Care; £175.5 million for Children's Services; £156.3 million Direct to Schools; £121.2 million for Communities, Economy & Transport; £48.4 million for Business Services; £40.9 million for Centrally Held Budgets; £27.9 million for Public Health; and £8.6 million for Governance Services.
Doughnut chart of gross spending
Doughnut chart of how we will spend your money (net). Total £416.7 million. With £192.1 million for Adult Social Care; £95.3 million for Children's Services; £61.9 million for Communities, Economy & Transport; £35.3 million for Centrally Held Budgets (Centrally Held Budgets include Treasury Management and contributions to the Capital Programme); £24.9 million for Business Services/Orbis; and £7.2 million for Governance Services.
Doughnut chart of net spending

*Centrally Held Budgets include Treasury Management and contributions to the Capital Programme

Doughnut chart of where the money comes from (gross). Total £868.4 million. With £310.4 million from Council Tax; £239.5 million from Dedicated Schools Grant; £108.5 million from Other Specific Grants; £81.5 million from Business Rates; £68.0 million from Fees, Charges and Receipts; £56.4 million from Other Grants/Use of Reserves; £3.6 million Revenue Support Grant; and £0.5 million New Homes Bonus/Transition Grant.
Doughnut chart of where the money comes from (gross)
Doughnut chart of where the money comes from (net). Total 416.7 million. With £310.4 million from Council Tax; £81.5 million from Business Rates; £17.1 million from Social Care Grants; £3.7 million from Local Tax Grants; £3.6 million from Revenue Support Grant; £0.5 million from New Homes Bonus.
Doughnut chart of where the money comes from (net)

Revenue spending

The diagrams below are a visual representation of our gross revenue budget for 2021/22. They also show East Sussex County Council spend inclusive of partnership working, where we are the lead authority. More information on our revenue budget can be found in our financial budget summary. You can also see our revenue spending data in a table.

Bubble chart of the gross revenue budget for East Sussex County Council for 2021/22. Total £868.43 million. With £331.83 million for Children's Services; £289.62 million for Adult Social Care; £121.2 million for Communities, Economy & Transport; £48.41 million for Business Services; £40.91 million for Central Held Budgets; £27.9 million for Public Health; and £8.56 million for Governance Services.
Bubble chart of revenue spending for East Sussex County Council in 2021/22

Adult Social Care

Bubble chart of revenue spending in Adult Social Care for 2021/22. Total £289.62 million. With £202.25 million for Independent Sector. And £86.49 million for Directly Provided Services and Assessment & Care Management. For details, go to the revenue spending data which is in a table
Bubble chart of revenue spending in Adult Social Care for 2021/22

Public Health

Bubble chart of revenue spending in Public Health for 2021/22. Total £27.90 million. With £10.7 million for Mental Health and Best Start; £10.5 million for Risky Behaviours & Threats to Health; £2.87 million for Health Systems; £2.55 million for Central Support; and £1.28 million for Communities.
Bubble chart of revenue spending in Public Health Care for 2021/22

Business Services

Bubble chart of revenue spending in Business Services for 2021/22. Total £48.41 million. With £26.72 million for Property; £11.81 million ESCC Contribution to Orbis; £6.29 million for IT & Digital; £2.21 million for Finance; £1.02 million for Procurement; and £0.37 million for HR & Organisational Development.
Bubble chart of revenue spending in Business Services for 2021/22

Children's Services

Bubble chart of revenue spending in Children's Services for 2021/22. Total £331.83 million. With £156.3 million for Schools; £91.4 million for Education and ISEND; £74.31 million for Early Help and Social Care; £5.71 million for Communications, Planning & Performance; £2.57 million for Central Resources; and £1.54 million for Adoption South East.
Bubble chart of revenue spending in Children's Services for 2021/22

Communities, Economy & Transport

Bubble chart of revenue spending in Communities, Economy & Transport for 2021/22. Total £121.2 million. With £82.25 million for Transport & Operational Services; £15.44 million for Highways; £7.04 million for Customer, Library and Registration Service; £5.77 million for Management & Support; £4.61 million for Communities: £3.2 million for Economic Development, Skills and Growth; and £2.89 million for Planning & Environment. For details, go to the revenue spending data which is in a table.
Bubble chart of revenue spending in Communities, Economy & Transport for 2021/22

Governance Services

Bubble chart of revenue spending in Governance Services for 2021/22. Total £8.56 million. With £5.26 million for Corporate Governance; and £3.3 million for Corporate Support.
Bubble chart of revenue spending in Governance Services for 2021/22

Revenue data

This table shows the most significant areas of spending in our gross revenue budget for 2021/22.

You can see a diagram of our revenue spending. You can also get more information on our revenue budget in our financial budget summary

Gross revenue budget for 2021/22.
Department Spending area Revenue budget
Adult Social Care Physical Support, Sensory Support and Support for Memory & Cognition £128.83m
Adult Social Care Learning Disability Support £65.24m
Adult Social Care Mental Health Support £8.18m
Adult Social Care Independent Sector Total £202.25m
Adult Social Care Physical Support, Sensory Support and Support for Memory & Cognition £14.78m
Adult Social Care Learning Disability Support £7.24m
Adult Social Care Mental Health Support £3.01m
Adult Social Care Substance Misuse Support £0.48m
Adult Social Care Equipment & Assistive Technology £5.60m
Adult Social Care Other £0.75m
Adult Social Care Supporting People £6.43m
Adult Social Care Assessment & Care Management £27.98m
Adult Social Care Carers £3.24m
Adult Social Care Management & Support £16.68m
Adult Social Care Service Strategy £0.29m
Adult Social Care Directly Provided Services and Assessment & Care Management Total £86.49m
Adult Social Care Safer Communities £0.89m
Adult Social Care Adult Social Care Total £289.62m
Public Health Mental Health and Best Start £10.70m
Public Health Risky Behaviours and Threats to Health £10.50m
Public Health Health Systems £2.87m
Public Health Communities £1.28m
Public Health Central Support £2.55m
Public Health Public Health Total £27.90m
Business Services Finance £2.21m
Business Services IT & Digital £6.29m
Business Services HR & Organisational Development £0.37m
Business Services Procurement £1.02m
Business Services Property £26.72m
Business Services ESCC Contribution to Orbis £11.81m
Business Services Business Services Total £48.41m
Children’s Services Central Resources £2.57m
Children’s Services Early Help & Social Care £74.31m
Children’s Services Education & ISEND £91.40m
Children’s Services Communications, Planning & Performance £5.71m
Children’s Services Adoption South East £1.54m
Children’s Services Schools £156.30m
Children’s Services Children’s Services Total £331.83m
Communities, Economy & Transport Waste £49.01m
Communities, Economy & Transport Home to School Transport £14.88m
Communities, Economy & Transport Other Transport & Operational Services £18.36m
Communities, Economy & Transport Transport & Operational Services Total £82.25m
Communities, Economy & Transport Communities £4.61m
Communities, Economy & Transport Customer, Library & Registration Service £7.04m
Communities, Economy & Transport Economic Development, Skills and Growth £3.20m
Communities, Economy & Transport Highways £15.44m
Communities, Economy & Transport Management & Support £5.77m
Communities, Economy & Transport Planning & Environment £2.89m
Communities, Economy & Transport Communities, Economy & Transport Total £121.20m
Governance Services Corporate Governance £5.26m
Governance Services Corporate Support £3.30m
Governance Services Governance Services Total £8.56m
Centrally Held Budgets Centrally Held Budgets £40.91m
EAST SUSSEX COUNTY COUNCIL Total Budget 2021/22 £868.43m

Capital programme

Capital Programme: projects in the year ahead 2021/22

As well as providing services, the Council invests in, and maintains, assets such as roads and buildings. The capital programme supports delivery of the Council’s priority outcomes, particularly driving sustainable economic growth and keeping vulnerable people safe. Details of the full current capital programme to 2023/24 are in our financial budget summary. Below are examples of key projects that will be underway in 2021/22 at a cost of £92.1m.

Doughnut chart of Capital Programme expenditure for 2021/22. Total £92.1 million. With £24.2 million for Schools; £23.2 million for Highways and Structural Maintenance; £15.8 million for Economic Growth and Strategic Infrastructure; £15.0 million for Buildings Maintenance and Efficiency; £11.9 million for Integrated Transport Schemes; and £2.0 million for Community and Social Care Facilities.
Doughnut chart of capital expenditure for 2021/22

Economic Growth & Strategic Infrastructure £15.8m

  • £5.1m to drive economic growth and create new jobs as part of the South East Local Enterprise Partnership's Getting Building Fund
  • £3.3m to increase the number of premises in the county that can access superfast broadband
  • £0.7m to build the Newhaven Port Access Road

Community & Social Care Facilities £2.0m

  • £0.9m for the development of Westfield Lane to provide additional accommodation for children within the county

Highways & Structural Maintenance £23.2m

  • Structural maintenance of highways to maintain and improve the road surface

Integrated Transport Schemes £11.9m

  • £2.7m of junction improvements in Hastings, Bexhill, Eastbourne, Hailsham and Polegate
  • £1.0m of walking and cycling movements in Eastbourne and South Wealden
  • £2.6m for the next phase of the Eastbourne Town Centre Improvements

Schools £24.2m

  • Primary school numbers in East Sussex peaked in 2018/19 and are starting to decline
  • The previous high numbers in primary schools are now being reflected in rising Year 7 secondary school intakes. Secondary school numbers are likely to peak around 2024/25 or 2025/26
  • We are planning for, or are in the process of creating, new school places in Eastbourne, Hailsham, Polegate, Robertsbridge and Newhaven/Peacehaven

Building Maintenance & Efficiency £15.0m

  • The Council will invest in improvements to buildings and technology to improve efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions

Capital Resourcing 2020/21 to 2023/24

Because capital projects may take several years to deliver we need to know how we will fund the full £289.2 million programme. Details of where this money will come from are given below.

Doughnut chart of Capital Programme resourcing for 2020/21 to 2023/24.  Total £ 289.2 million. With £91.5 million from Borrowing; £89.3 million from Government Grants; £42.7 million from Specific Funding; £28.3 million from Reserves and Revenues Set Aside; £19.0 million from Capital Receipts; and £18.4 million from Income (including Section 106 and Community Infrastructure Levy).
Doughnut chart of capital programme resourcing for 2020/21 to 2023/24

Promoting equality of opportunity

Equality impact assessment summary report for Council Plan 2021/22

Date of assessment: 26/03/2021

Summary of findings: Our Council Plan aims to deliver positive outcomes for the people of East Sussex. A number of the planned actions and initiatives will have a positive impact upon the lives of groups of people with protected characteristics. There should not be any negative impact for any equality target groups.

Summary of recommendations and key points of action plan: None.

Groups that this project or service will impact upon (no groups were impacted negatively).
Group Positive Neutral
Age X -
Disability X -
Ethnicity X -
Gender/Transgender X -
Marital Status
/Civil Partnership
- X
Pregnancy and Maternity X -
Religion/Belief - X
Sexual Orientation - X
Other (carers, literacy, health,
rurality, poverty)
X -

In line with best practice we ensure that equalities considerations are embedded throughout our business planning and performance management processes. Our Council Plan priorities and delivery outcomes are designed to help address identified inequalities in outcomes for different groups in our local community and incorporate our equality objectives. We will report on our progress in delivering the actions in this Council Plan that will advance equality as part of our Annual report, which will be published in Autumn 2021.

More information on equality and diversity can be found on our equality and diversity web page.

Equality Framework for Local Government logo
Equality framework logo
Disability Confident Logo
Disability confident logo

Performance measures and targets

Targets - Driving sustainable economic growth

You can also download an expanded version of the Driving sustainable economic growth [30.6 KB] [xlsx] measures in an Excel table, with targets for the next three years. The download will appear in the bottom left of the screen and will open in a new window.

Targets - Keeping vulnerable people safe

Measures and targets
Performance measure 2021/22 Target 2020 - 2024 Outcome Summary
National outcome measure: The proportion of people who use services who say that those services have made them feel safe and secure ≥87.0% Services received by adults with long term support also have a positive impact on their safety
Health and Social Care Connect – percentage of referrals triaged and progressed to required services within required timescales 90% Services are provided in a timely manner
Health and Social Care Connect – % of contacts that are appropriate and effective (i.e. lead to the provision of necessary additional services) 95% Monitor the number of contacts from health professionals that aren’t taken any further
The % of people affected by domestic violence and abuse who have improved safety/support measures in place upon leaving the service 80% To enable vulnerable people who have been affected by domestic violence to feel more in control of their life, and better able to make decisions to increase their safety
When they leave the service the % of those affected by rape, sexual violence and abuse who have improved coping strategies 88% Protect vulnerable people who have been affected by rape, sexual violence and abuse, and provide them with skills which enable them to be more in control of their lives and more optimistic about the future
Rate of children with a Child Protection Plan (per 10,000 children) To be set June 2021 Children at risk from significant harm are kept safe
Rate (of 0-17 population) of referrals to children’s social care services (per 10,000 children) ≤539 Children at risk from significant harm are kept safe
Rate (of 0-17 population) of assessments completed by children’s social care services (per 10,000 children) ≤557 Children at risk from significant harm are kept safe
Rate of Looked After Children (per 10,000 children) To be set June 2021 Children at risk from significant harm are kept safe
The number of positive interventions for vulnerable people who have been the target of rogue trading or financial abuse 200 Residents of East Sussex are safe in their own home and protected from criminals. Residents are empowered to feel safe and supported to say “no” to criminals and deter and disrupt criminal activity

You can also download an expanded version of the Keeping vulnerable people safe [27.5 KB] [xlsx] measures in an Excel table, with targets for the next three years. The download will appear in the bottom left of the screen and will open in a new window.

Targets - Helping people help themselves

Measures and targets
Performance measure 2021/22 Target 2020 - 2024 Outcome Summary
Road Safety: Implement behaviour change project Identify appropriate targets and develop a behavioural change intervention and suitable evaluation protocols Reduce the number of KSI on East Sussex roads using behavioural change methods and the implementation of infrastructure schemes to improve outcomes for residents, businesses and visitors to East Sussex
Road Safety: Deliver targeted cycle training activities to vulnerable road users Deliver Bikeability training to 4,000 individuals and complete 45 Wheels for All sessions Reduce the number of KSI on East Sussex roads using behavioural change methods and the implementation of infrastructure schemes to improve outcomes for residents, businesses and visitors to East Sussex
Road Safety: Implement infrastructure schemes on identified high risk routes to improve road safety Implement 20 Local Safety Schemes and 2 route treatments Reduce the number of KSI on East Sussex roads using behavioural change methods and the implementation of infrastructure schemes to improve outcomes for residents, businesses and visitors to East Sussex
Percentage of older people who are delayed from discharge when they are medically fit Establish baseline There are no unnecessary delayed discharges from hospital
National outcome measure: Proportion of working age adults and older people receiving self-directed support 100% Adults are able to take control of the support they receive 
National outcome measure: Proportion of working age adults and older people receiving direct payments ≥34.3% Adults who require support are able to live as independently as possible
Number of carers supported through short-term crisis intervention 390 Carers are supported when they most need it enabling them to carry on in their caring role
Number of people receiving support through housing related floating support 5,000 Adults can maintain their independence
Enhance the delivery of Technology Enabled Care Services (TECS) more rapidly and more widely across areas including falls; frailty; crisis response; medication management, to avoid hospital admissions or re-admissions 8,500 people receiving TECS Adults can maintain their independence 
Building upon existing joint and partnership working and in the context of the development of Integrated Care Systems (ICS) design, agree and implement:
i - An integrated commissioning model.
ii - An integrated provider model for Health and Social Care in East Sussex
Service models developed and approved by the East Sussex Health and Social Care system and an implementation timetable with key milestones agreed Through joint and partnership working ensure all available resources are used to deliver maximum benefits to local people and achieve value for money
Number of providers registered with Support With Confidence 10% increase on 2020/21 outturn Increase the options for people who need support ensuring vulnerable people are given effective reliable support to help maintain their independence
The proportion of people who received short-term services during the year, where no further request was made for ongoing support >90.5% Provide effective early intervention to ensure people are given the support they need as quickly as possible, this will also reduce the need for more expensive intensive interventions at a later date ensuring the most effective use of resources
Through the Drug and Alcohol Funding streams, commission services that sustain the development of the recovery community in East Sussex Commission services The rates of people entering recovery from drug and alcohol misuse are maximised and the stigma associated with misuse is reduced
Percentage of EHCP (Education, Health and Care Plans) annual review meetings where the child gave their view and/or participated 85% Children and young people with SEND participate in decisions to ensure that their needs are understood, and they are supported to achieve their potential
The proportion of respondents to the feedback surveys who agree that things have changed for the better as a result of getting targeted support from the 0 – 19 Early Help Service 85% The services provided are making a difference to the lives of service users
Number of households eligible under the government’s Troubled Families programme receiving a family support intervention To be set June 2021 pending information from Government Families supported by family keywork achieve their goals and the Council is able to maximise payment by results claims
Number of new service user interventions started through One You East Sussex as part of the Integrated Lifestyle Service 7,000 Support people (particularly those with multiple lifestyle risk factors such as smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, poor diet and low physical activity) to make changes to improve health outcomes and reduce their risk of developing conditions such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease
Improved targeting of NHS Heath Checks 100% of GP practices recommence delivery of NHS Health Check service including targeted service People understand their future risk of developing vascular disease and make changes to their lifestyle, or receive additional clinical advice and support to reduce their risk

You can also download an expanded version of the Helping people help themselves [29.3 KB] [xlsx] measures in an Excel table, with targets for the next three years. The download will appear in the bottom left of the screen and will open in a new window.

Targets - Making best use of resources in the short and long term

Measures and targets
Performance measure 2021/22 Target 2020 - 2024 Outcome Summary
Number of working days lost per FTE (Full Time Equivalent) employee due to sickness absence in non-school services 9.24 To maximise the use of resources and improve staff and customer wellbeing
Deliver the Property Asset Investment Strategy Outline Business cases brought forward against at least 2 priority projects Our Property Asset and Disposal Investment Strategy will explore income generation from property, optimise capital receipts and promote economic growth across the county.
Review use of corporate buildings Develop new ways of working based on revised business requirements The Workstyles review will determine the future use of our corporate buildings to better utilise space and enable new ways of working. Once fully embedded this will lead to reduced cost of occupancy in our core corporate buildings.
Reduce the amount of CO2 arising from County Council operations 13% reduction on 2020/21 A reduction in the amount of CO2 arising from Council operations is recorded on an annual basis, thus reducing the cost of energy to the Council and shrinking the carbon footprint.

You can also download an expanded version of the Making best use of resources in the short and long term [26.9 KB] [xlsx] measures in an Excel table, with targets for the next three years. The download will appear in the bottom left of the screen and will open in a new window.


State of the County data

We review a wide range of data to help us understand the context for our plans and the impact we are having through our work and in partnership. We publish this data each year in State of the County – Focus on East Sussex, when we start the planning process that leads to this Council Plan. A selection of this data is listed below. Unless otherwise stated the data refers to 2019/20. Where possible official national statistics are used for comparison with the England average.

Driving sustainable economic growth

2019/20
Measure East Sussex England
Percentage of working age residents (16-64) with a level 4 qualification or above (includes degrees, Higher National Certificate, Higher National Diploma and others) 35.6% (Calendar Year  2019) 40.0% (Calendar Year  2019)
Percentage of working age residents (16-64) with no qualifications or qualified only to National Vocational Qualification 1 19.2% (Calendar Year 2019) 17.6% (Calendar Year 2019)
Annual gross full time earnings, median average (residence based) £30,116 £31,766
Percentage of working age population (16-64) in employment 80.1% 76.2%
People claiming unemployment related benefits (alternative claimant count), percentage of population aged 16-64 3.0% 3.2%
New business registration rate per 10,000 people over 16 55.0 76.9
New houses built, total completed / total affordable 1,852 / 468 -
Percentage of children achieving a good level of development in all areas of learning (‘expected’ or ‘exceeded’ in the three prime areas of learning and within literacy and numeracy) in the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFSP) 76.0% 71.8%*
Percentage of pupils reaching the expected standard at key stage 2 in reading, writing and mathematics 62% 65%*
Average Attainment 8 score per pupil state funded secondary schools 45.3 46.8*
Average Progress 8 score for state funded secondary schools -0.06 -0.03*
Percentage of pupils who achieved a 9-5 pass in English and maths GCSEs 41.7% 43.4%*
Average Attainment 8 score per pupil for Looked After Children 14.9 19.1*
Average point score (APS) per entry for level 3 exams including A levels (16-18 year-olds) 30.98 32.23*
Attainment of A level students (age 16-18) average point score (APS) per entry, best 3 30.00 32.89*
Attainment of A level students (age 16-18 ) % achieving grades AAB or better at A level, of which at least two are in facilitating subjects 9.6% 14.1%*

*This data is for the academic year 2018/19 and has not been updated because exams were suspended in 2020.

 

Keeping vulnerable people safe

2019/20
Measure East Sussex England
Rate per 10,000 (aged 0 –17 population) of Looked After Children 56 67
Rate per 10,000 (aged 0-17 population) of children with a Child Protection Plan 50.4 42.8
Percentage of children who ceased to be looked after adopted during the year ending 31 March 16% 11%
Proportion of people who use Adult Social Care services who feel safe 70.9% 70.2%
Percentage of people (65 and over) who were still at home 91 days after discharge from hospital 88.4% 82.0%
Suicide rate per 100,000 of population three-year average 13.5 (2017-19) 10.1 (2017-19)

Helping people help themselves

2019/20
Measure East Sussex England
Percentage of children aged 4-5 years with excess weight (overweight or obese), by postcode of child 23.0% 23.0%
Percentage of children aged 10-11 years with excess weight (overweight or obese) by postcode of child 32.0% 35.2%
Long-term support needs of younger adults (aged 18-64) met by admission to residential and nursing care homes, per 100,000 population per year 12.4 14.6
Long-term support needs of older adults (aged 65 and over) met by admission to residential and nursing care homes, per 100,000 population per year 485.5 584.0
Proportion of older people aged 65 and over who received reablement services following discharge from hospital 3.1% 2.6%
The outcome of short-term services: sequel to service: proportion of people who received short-term services during the year, where no further request was made for ongoing support or support of a lower level 93.3% 79.5%
Proportion of people who use Adult Social Care services who find it easy to find information about services 75.7% 68.4%
Social Isolation: percentage of Adult Social Care users who have as much social contact as they would like 52.4% 45.9%
Number of people killed or seriously injured on the roads 407 (Calendar Year 2019) -